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Carisbrooke Medical Centre and Dower House set to merge


Carisbrooke Medical Centre and Dower House Surgery are set to merge this Autumn – to help improve and sustain our services to you in the long-term.


NHS Isle of Wight Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) has approved our formal merger from October 1.


We have previously informed your representatives on our Patient Participation Group of our intentions – and they understand our thinking and why this move is being planned.


A full patient Question and Answers factsheet is available in reception, which will hopefully answer your questions.


GP partners at both practices and the CCG strongly believe that the mergers is in the best interest of patients at a time of growing demand and pressures on primary services with people living longer - including many with more complex long-term health conditions.


Both sites will remain open and there are no threats to any staff jobs.


They will help both practice offer you – our patients - a bigger pool of clinical skills and staffing resources and far greater resilience, with more robust cover for staff holiday leave and sickness.


Other benefits for us will include: a better range of appointments, with patients being offered appointments at either side, the ability to be able to develop new services, bring in other health professionals to be able to meet their patients’ diverse needs, a better ability to recruit and bring in a range of GPs who have other skills, such as dermatology and mental health – again better meeting their patients’ needs, developing specialist admin teams to deal more efficiently with patient requests.


Our two practices are already working closely together, and the merger will help build on existing relationships.


In 2018, we joined forces to launch a new minor illness service to help meet the demand for same-day appointments – and commissioned a musculo-skeletal service (MSK) and piloted a prescription ordering service.


Dr Timothy Whelan from Dower House, said: “We are already facing problems recruiting GPs who have left or retired – and Carisbrooke also has GPs who are nearing retirement. Together, our two practices will be much stronger to face future challenges and be better placed to further improve our services to patients.”


Dr Judith More from Carisbrooke, added: “Patients will have greater choice by choosing which medical centre they attend – although some specialist services or clinics may only be available at one of them. Our practices have already proved that they work well together to improve patient services.”

In Times of Bereavement

In the unfortunate event that a person has passed away, there are three things that must be done in the first few days;

  • Get a medical certificate from your GP or hospital doctor (this is necessary to register the death)
  • Register the death within 5 days (8 days in Scotland). You will then receive the necessary documents for the funeral.
  • Make the necessary funeral arrangements.

Register the death

If the death has been reported to the coroner (or Procurator Fiscal in Scotland) they must give permission before registering the death.

You can register the death if you are a relative, a witness to the death, a hospital administrator or the person making the arrangements with the funeral directors.

You can use the ‘Register a Death’ page on the gov.uk website that will guide you through the process. This will also explain the registration process for Scotland and Northern Ireland.

Arrange the funeral

The funeral can usually only take place after the death is registered. Most people use a funeral director, though you can arrange a funeral yourself.

Funeral directors

Choose a funeral director who’s a member of one of the following:

These organisations have codes of practice - they must give you a price list when asked.

Some local councils run their own funeral services, for example for non-religious burials. The British Humanist Association can also help with non-religious funerals.

Arranging the funeral yourself

Contact the Cemeteries and Crematorium Department of your local council to arrange a funeral yourself.

Funeral costs

Funeral costs can include:

  • funeral director fees
  • things the funeral director pays for on your behalf (called ‘disbursements’ or ‘third-party costs’), for example, crematorium or cemetery fees, or a newspaper announcement about the death
  • local authority burial or cremation fees

Funeral directors may list all these costs in their quotes.



 
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